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Boot Configurations & Recommendations
OVERVIEW

This document provides useful information on the setup and configuration of the Kingston DCP1000 NVMe Add In Card, providing a reference guide for configuring DCP1000 NVMe drives in both Linux and Windows environments.

Recommendations for configuring DCP1000 as the data drives with and without a separate boot drive in Linux and windows environments will be covered.

DCP1000
RECOMMENDED CONFIGURATION: DCP1000 as Data Drive

Typical configurations include a DCP1000 as a data drive and a separate boot drive (typically single or dual SATA drives). Our recommended configuration would use a separate boot device and use the DCP1000 as the primary data storage drive. This configuration enables maximum performance and capacity from the DCP1000 and best ROI for data storage purposes.

Recommended Configuration:

Recommended Configuration:

INSTALLING DCP1000 with a Separate SATA Boot Drive
  1. With the DCP1000 card installed in the motherboard, turn the system on. Stop in BIOS setup screen (usually DEL or F2).

  2. The DCP1000 card will present 4 drives in the BIOS. The connected SATA device(s) will also show up in the BIOS as an available drive. Any of the available SATA drives should be selected as the primary boot drive. Verify that the DCP1000’s four NVMe drives are still visible (see Boot menu, or other Advanced menu).

  3. New installations are recommended to be UEFI (not Legacy, unless Legacy is specifically required). The UEFI-vs-Legacy choice is usually found in the CSM menu. CSM first has to be enabled, then choose UEFI). UEFI is the recommended mode of operation for the DCP1000.

  4. Save BIOS settings and restart if you made any changes.

OS installation:
  1. Once the UEFI setting is enabled and the SATA drives show up in BIOS, proceed with a standard OS installation. For example, it is possible to just install from a USB drive. The SATA drive will be chosen as the target as you step through the installation.

  2. Once the OS install is complete, ensure the SATA drive is selected as the first selection in BIOS for booting. The OS you installed should then boot up from the SATA device.

OPTIONAL CONFIGURATION: DCP1000 SSD as Boot Drive

Some customers may still want to use a DCP1000 SSD as the primary boot drive; this configuration is possible. The below provides the setup procedures to enable one of the DCP1000 NVMe SSDs as the boot device:

OPTIONAL CONFIGURATION:

Installing One of the DCP1000 SSD as Boot Drive
  1. With the DCP1000 card installed in the motherboard, turn the system on. Stop in BIOS setup screen (usually DEL or F2).

  2. The DCP1000 card will present 4 drives in the BIOS, any of these drives can be used as the primary boot drive. Verify that the 4 drives are visible (see Boot menu, or other Advanced menu). This is the same as when booting from a SATA drive. The NVMe and SATA drives show up in BIOS.

  3. New installations are recommended to be UEFI (not Legacy, unless Legacy is specifically required). The UEFI-vs-Legacy choice is usually found in the CSM menu. CSM first has to be enabled, then choose UEFI). UEFI is recommended mode of operation.

  4. Save BIOS settings and restart if you made any changes.

OS installation:
  1. Once the UEFI setting is enabled and the DCP drives show up in BIOS, you can do a standard OS installation. For example, it is possible to just install from a USB drive. The NVMe drive (0 or 1 or 2 or 3 on the DCP1000) will be chosen as the target as you step through the installation. Pick the NVMe drive you want as a bootable target, and install to that particular one. Same as an OS install of a SATA device.

  2. After OS install completes, ensure that the desired NVMe drive is selected as the first selection in BIOS for booting. The remaining 3 drives on the DCP1000 card will be available for data drives or data volumes in the OS.

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